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Utility, Fairness, and Risk

In News Updates by The SoundMind Project

A Discussion with Medical Ethicist Nir Eyal Source: Harvard College of Effective Altruism | Melody Y. Guan, November 2014 Nir Eyal is Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine in the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School and at the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He is a co-editor of the …

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Scientists Map Out Entire Genetic Code of Iceland

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

Source You can basically trace all human diversity, the risk of disease and the response to treatment Late last month, researchers out of Iceland announced that they’d made a major leap in the field of genetics: They’d mapped the entire genetic code of their nation, the largest genomic study ever. This project, detailed in four interconnected papers in the current …

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The Bhutan Epilepsy Project wins Neuro Film Fest

In News Updates by The SoundMind Project

The film showcasing the Bhutan Epilepsy Project has received the Grand Prize at the American Academy of Neurology’s Neuro Film Festival, which took place during the AAN’s 67th annual meeting this April. From American Academy of Neurology: WASHINGTON, DC – The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Brain Foundation are pleased to announce the winning entries to the 2015 Neuro Film …

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Using Adderall to Get Ahead, Not to Fight A.D.H.D.

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

Source: The New York Times Drugs like Adderall were once only prescribed to help highly distractible children with attention deficit disorders focus on their school work. Then college students found those drugs, amphetamine-like stimulants, could increase their ability to study. Now a growing number of workers use them to help compete, whether or not they have A.D.H.D. What will happen …

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Increased physical activity improves sleep and mood outcomes in inactive people with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

By Corynn Greene While high levels of activity and exercise training have been associated with improvements in sleep quality, minimum levels of activity likely to improve sleep outcomes have not been explored. A two-armed parallel randomized controlled trial (N=41; 30 females) was designed to assess whether increasing physical activity to the level recommended in public health guidelines can improve sleep …

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Dementia and the Power of Music Therapy

In SoundMind Blog by Nate Totushek

Dementia is now a leading cause of both mortality and morbidity, particularly in western nations, and current projections for rates of dementia suggest this will worsen. More than ever, cost effective and creative non-pharmacological therapies are needed to ensure we have an adequate system of care and supervision. Music therapy is one such measure, yet to date statements of what …

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What’s a neuron?

In SoundMind Blog by Nate Totushek

This is the first in a series exploring Sleep Science. It is an exploration into the hormonal implications of sleep, but it also functions as a lay-person’s introduction to neuroscience. The first step in examining some of the physiological evidence to supplement the behavioral science we conduct every day is to review the behavior of the synapse, where one neuron meets …