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MDMA-Assisted-Psychotherapy is Incredibly Effective for PTSD

In SoundMind Blog by Hannah McLane

A new study in the Lancet Psychiatry shows that the active ingredient in ecstasy – MDMA – is effective when used for post-traumatic stress disorder. Several Phase 2 trials have been completed with a total of 107 participants; there was an overall PTSD remission rate of 61% after 2 months and 68% after 12 months.

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Utility, Fairness, and Risk

In News Updates by The SoundMind Project

A Discussion with Medical Ethicist Nir Eyal Source: Harvard College of Effective Altruism | Melody Y. Guan, November 2014 Nir Eyal is Associate Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine in the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School and at the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He is a co-editor of the …

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“An Expert on Nothing”

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

The Work of an Investigator of False Memories By Corynn Greene Source: Investigating False Memories: Memory is Unreliable and Malleable Meet Elizabeth Loftus: forensic psychologist, professor, and researcher of false memories? Yes, Loftus has conducted a plethora of studies affirming her stance that, “The human memory is unreliable at best, and malleable enough to wreck the lives of the unjustly accused.” To …

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Repurposing The Brain’s Visual Center

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

Study Shows Blind Children Can Repurpose Their Brain’s Visual Center By Corynn Greene Source: Blind children can repurpose brain’s visual center to process speech – study A recent study at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore has shown that parts of the brain once thought to be primarily devoted to processing vision can be recruited by blind children as young as five …

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New Findings Support Music as a Treatment for Epilepsy

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

By Corynn Greene Source: Could Music Help Treat Epilepsy? Epilepsy, also referred to as ‘seizure disorder,’ is a neurological disorder associated with abnormal electrical activity in the brain in which nerve cell activity is disturbed causing sudden, recurrent episodes of sensory interference, loss of consciousness, or convulsions. It is strikingly common – with an estimated 1 in 26 developing epilepsy at …

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On the Art of Dying

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

By Corynn Greene Oliver Wolf Sacks is many things – a neurologist, a writer, a professor, and as of earlier this year he’s a sufferer of terminal cancer. His reveal of being diagnosed with multiple metastases in the liver pulled at the heartstrings of everyone who read it, announcing that his, “luck has run out,” and that this cancer, “cannot be halted.” …

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New Study Relates The Effect of Poverty on Kids’ Brains

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

By Corynn Greene Source: How Poverty Stunts Kids’ Brain Development We can all agree that one’s socioeconomic background is a definitive factor when it comes to things like their development and education, but according to a recent study conducted by researcher Seth Pollack of the University of Wisconsin–Madison this can be attributed to more than just access (or lack there …

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Monkey ‘Brain-Net’ Raises Prospect of Human Brain-to-Brain Connection

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

By Corynn Greene Source: Monkey ‘Brain-Net’ Raises Prospect of Human Brain-to-Brain Connection “Essentially we created a super-brain – a collective brain created from three monkey brains. Nobody has ever done that before.” – Miguel Nicolelis, Duke University Recently, three monkeys have joined together to form a “brain-net” – meaning scientists have found a way to link together their brains in a …

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New Study Brings Together Neuroscience and Psychology to Paint a More Complete Picture of Sleep and Memory

In SoundMind Blog by Corynn Greene

By Corynn Greene Source: New Study Brings Together Neuroscience and Psychology to Paint a More Complete Picture of Sleep and Memory A new study from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) integrates neuroscience and psychological research to show in animal models that sleep suppresses the activity of certain nerve cells that promote forgetting, insuring that at least some …